Support our Los Angeles art world homies with this great Kickstarter project: a mobile gallery and educational laboratory, stuffed into a repurposed school bus.  :)

The drive ends real soon, so act fast! 

tracyjeannerosenthal:

Will you sit next to us? (Say yes here.)

Our school bus won’t be yellow. It’s not for kids (though kids are welcome). This July, we’re converting a school bus into P.S.1010, a mobile laboratory for researching the connections between art, social spaces, and education.

School buses are sites for unconventional learning, social experimentation, and community building—they’re where we learned how to meet new people, plan minor rebellions, trade gossip, share secrets, doodle, and dream. We want to find out what else can they be.

Our bus will be an open place to gather, learn, talk and connect in; a social space for free rides and free dialogues. We’ll invite local artists, teachers, and community organizers, to board and give workshops, perform, install, discuss, and exhibit. And we’ll use the bus as a connector, transporting communities between spaces, and ideas between communities, collectively learning, un-learning, and re-making our world.

We’d love for you to ride with us, whether that means donating to our kickstarter, sharing the link on your blog, on Facebook, tweeting, or telepathing. All aboard.

Longform Podcast: Ann Friedman →

annfriedman:

Hey, I’m the guest on this week’s Longform Podcast! Listen to me and my pal Max Linsky talk about why I’m glad I had experience as an editor before I became a freelance writer, why I believe in kissing down rather than kissing up, what really went down at GOOD, and why I’m so excited to be working at this moment in media.

#WARM & #FUZZIES

We’re thrilled to be a finalist for general excellence in the 2013 Utne Media Awards! Congrats to all the other nominees.

We’re thrilled to be a finalist for general excellence in the 2013 Utne Media Awards! Congrats to all the other nominees.

Tomorrow mag contributor Josh Begley has tweeted every U.S. drone attack since 2002. →

How We Spent It

Well, now that (most of) the dust has settled and we’ve made a magazine, we want to show you all how we did it. Er, at least how we figured out the finances. See the full breakdown here.

Major takeaway? We set our Kickstarter ask way too low. If we had merely hit our goal ($15,000) and stopped there, we’d have lost money on this endeavor. A lot of money. As it turned out, though, with our awesome backers funding us at three times our goal, some generous sponsorship from folks like MailChimp and Flipboard, and additional online sales, we’ve been able to pay ourselves and our collaborators a little something.

image

After we paid our startup costs and printing and shipping fees, how’d we allocate the profits? We divided them equally  among three tiers: Founder tier (for those of us who have been putting in hours and hours since June and worked ‘round the clock during the magazine production period), feature tier (for contributors who pitched in on major aspects of the design, those who reported feature-length articles, and those who did a lot of fact-checking or copy-editing), and contributor tier (for illustrators and writers of shorter articles). Then we divided the money equally among everyone in that tier and rounded down, as we’ve still got a few lingering bills to pay and want to keep a small cushion in the bank account.

image

It shook out to about $1,000 for each of the founders, $500 for feature contributors, and $200 for other contributors. These figures are low. We openly acknowledge that they do not reflect the amount of labor that went into making the magazine. But this was a passion project for everyone involved, and we think that shows in the final product

We were going to do a side-by-side comparison with what the magazine would have cost had we paid fair market rates, but once we started tallying it up, we realized it was just too depressing. Also, we’re still busy mailing out Kickstarter incentives like stickers and totes. Being your own shipping and fulfillment house is no picnic, people. Many thanks for your patience! And thanks again to everyone who supported us financially. We hope you think of it as money well spent.

originalwhip:

This fabulous illustration by my good friend Kathy Garcia graces the pages of my Tomorrow magazine piece “The End of Male.” I report on the mounting body of scientific evidence connecting birth defects and declining fertility among males to a proliferation of chemicals from plastics and cosmetics in the environment. Many researchers believe these chemicals, called endocrine disruptors, could have a feminizing effect on male bodies—and possibly male brains and behavior—while they’re still in the womb.
It’s heavy shit. To lighten it up, I also get a fertility test of my own and make Ru Paul jokes.
Enjoy!

originalwhip:

This fabulous illustration by my good friend Kathy Garcia graces the pages of my Tomorrow magazine piece “The End of Male.” I report on the mounting body of scientific evidence connecting birth defects and declining fertility among males to a proliferation of chemicals from plastics and cosmetics in the environment. Many researchers believe these chemicals, called endocrine disruptors, could have a feminizing effect on male bodies—and possibly male brains and behavior—while they’re still in the womb.

It’s heavy shit. To lighten it up, I also get a fertility test of my own and make Ru Paul jokes.

Enjoy!

unequal-design:

Update your deck stickers.

Tote bags and stickers shipping this week!

unequal-design:

Update your deck stickers.

Tote bags and stickers shipping this week!

Our launch party got some props in the LA Times today. And, yes, everybody there was that adorable. 

Our launch party got some props in the LA Times today. And, yes, everybody there was that adorable. 

9:42am
28 notes
Reblogged from coverjunkie
coverjunkie:

Tomorrow
Great new addition on Coverjunkie:Tomorrow magazine:design director Dylan C. Lathrop tells me the aces who create this mag come from fab GOOD mag, then raised money on Kickstarter to make this baby

We’re thrilled to be featured on Coverjunkie, which spotlights beautiful magazines from around the world. If you’re not following the Coverjunkie Tumblr, you should be!

coverjunkie:

Tomorrow

Great new addition on Coverjunkie:
Tomorrow magazine:
design director Dylan C. Lathrop tells me the aces who create this mag come from fab GOOD mag, then raised money on Kickstarter to make this baby

We’re thrilled to be featured on Coverjunkie, which spotlights beautiful magazines from around the world. If you’re not following the Coverjunkie Tumblr, you should be!

Inside Tomorrow: Election Day edition

In time for Election Day—tomorrow, of course—Tomorrow mag brings you relevant (but not horserace-y) reads to prepare for the voting booth:

May the Odds Be Ever in Your Favor: On the heels of star statistician Nate Silver’s bold prediction of an Obama victory (and bet with Joe Scarborough), we bring you a deeper look at the brave new world of political prediction in a data-clogged society.

Vote for Pedro: While the nation obsesses about the next president, the Latino youth movement is busy knocking on doors in their own neighborhoods. And some of them are running for office. Meet 20-year-old Pedro Lopez, the DREAMer generation’s Leslie Knope.

Dashboard Congressional: The user interface of democracy is in dire need of a redesign. We visualize our fantasy system on the internets, in five steps.